Sketchbook Project 2018

It’s been three years since I last participated in the Sketchbook Project. In the meantime, my drawing styles have evolved and I’ve finally moved to New York, so it seemed like a good time to do another sketchbook.

The last sketchbook was an overview of my markmaking and how it was affected by my forays into coding; this time around I decided to focus my sketchbook on a particular style. Lately I’ve been using a technique that builds on itself in “quadrants” (video here) to develop rhythm and work larger.

Each page will follow a certain set of rules within the quadrant style. I’m planning to add the rules for each spread on the drawings at the end of the project as well:

Here’s some progress shots:

The sketchbook will be digitized after it’s submitted to Brooklyn Art Library.

Central Park series: data-driven artwork

In this small series, I worked with the axidraw pen plotter and Processing to imagine the new growth happening in early spring in Central Park.

From the warmth of my room, I researched March weather data in Central Park as well as geotagged posts of spring flowers, outsourcing my reference-gathering to the data of others.

I made some simple plots of the weather data using Processing, comparing humidity and temperature by date and plotting the points as small circles.

Cloud cover was additionally represented by adding rings around the circles (the rule was to add one extra ring if cloud cover was between 30% and 60%, two if it was anything over 60%).

With the axidraw, I could then draw the plots accurately and precisely using waterproof artist’s pen directly onto watercolor paper.

I drew lines to create dimensional relationships between the data points, and then “grew” the flowers I’d been researching from home out of the spaces between the data points.

The data formed a “garden” to situate the flowers, and their pattern was dependent on its form, as with the growth anticipated in the season.

The data forms them and gives a structure to their layout, just like the forces represented by that data enable the form of our gardens year over year.

Sketchbook Project

This year I’m participating in the Sketchbook Project, a program of the Brooklyn Art Library which houses all the sketchbooks of past participants; my sketchbook will also be digitized for view online.
I’ve been working on a number of new projects so far this year that aren’t conducive to sketchbooks, but I thought that would be a good reason to use the sketchbook as a kind of journal of how my markmaking changes over the course of doing those projects. I’ve already noticed that after starting to work with Processing, I’ve been drawing much more regular and geometric shapes. I don’t seem to have a shortage of new marks to add, luckily!
Update: My sketchbook is now digitized in full at https://www.sketchbookproject.com/library/17293
Below are my own photographs of some of my favorite spreads.
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