Sketch notes: Margaret Livingstone at NYU

Margaret Livingstone spoke at NYU on the subject of “What Art Can Tell Us About the Brain” on Tuesday, and I filled this page before she even got to the Q&A. I’d been curious to see her speak because of my interest in perception and how she relates it to art, and the talk was very spirited. She explained different aspects of perception with a series of optical illusions, including her insights on the Mona Lisa’s smile which I’d seen and found fascinating.

A couple of the biggest takeaways from this were:

  • our visual processing “normalizes” the visual information we get, and artists know + play with this, which explains why a painting of a scene will regularly be different from a photograph of a similar scene.
  • many visual processing quirks stem from the fact that there are two processing streams when parsing an image, and one is colorblind (the older system). This explains the “shimmery” effect we get from colors that have color contrast but no luminance contrast, for example.
  • From the overflow to these notes: on the impact of diorama-type work, she said “Maybe by making something the wrong size, artists get you to process it with a different part of your brain”, referencing things like how we don’t really process an image of a face if it’s upside down. This is food for thought for me as I continue to work with, and be interested, in representations of space at small scales.

EYEO Festival visual notes

I recently attended Eyeo Festival for the second time, in early June. This time, instead of my separate sketch and written journals, I took notes all in my multimedia sketchbook. This meant that for almost every talk I attended, I ended up with at least one page full of important quotes and memorable visuals. Some highlights:
01 alexis lloyd
Alexis Lloyd on the history of robots and androids in our culture and our relationship to them. The video of her talk is up here!
02 tega brain
Tega Brain on her amazing IoT-type art projects she called “post-scary media arts”. She’s an inspiration. View the talk here.
03 patricio gonzalez vivo
Patricio Gonzalez Vivo on synchronicity and his AMAZING projects. Check out the talk here.
04 ben fry
Ben Fry, head of Fathom Information Design and co-creator of the fundamental computational drawing tool Processing, telling it like it is about “data visualization… and its hip cousin, “data-vis!””. See the whole talk here.
05 gene kogan
Gene Kogan presented so much fascinating info about style transfer and machine learning that I literally wrote off the page. He’s the only presenter I had to use more than one page for. Somehow I still managed to get some visual representations of his slides in too! They help me remember the presentation since I’m mostly visual. And since the video isn’t up on the eyeo channel yet—soon?
I’m not sure if you can tell yet, but Eyeo was -extremely- inspirational. I’m in love with all the projects here, and I’m so glad I have my notes to remind me what I want to strive for. I’ve already had a hand in some style transfer experiments using my maps—keep an eye out for a post on that soon!